The paidContent 50: The Most Successful Digital Media Companies In The U.S.

The paidContent 50: The Most Successful Digital Media Companies In The U.S.

Excerpt:

Our list is a ranking based on digital sales, which, in our minds, is a fair indicator of digital success. Where digital sales figures were publicly available, we used them; in cases where they weren’t, we estimated them, using a variety of sources, including comments executives have made to the press, research reports, and conversations with industry analysts. We also reached out directly to dozens of companies that don’t report digital sales, although most—including major media conglomerates that only a few years ago were trumpeting their digital revenue figures—declined to provide that information to us.  Some insisted the digital data was too tied into other parts of the business to break out.

We’re the first to admit that the list contains a fair amount of guesswork—informed guesswork but guesswork nonetheless. It is meant to help kick off a deeper conversation about digital success.

Some high-level takeaways from our ranking: Businesses that generate digital revenue by selling ads dominate our list; companies that make most of their money selling online content or subscriptions took only 13 of the 50 spots. And while many traditional media companies may be struggling to grow their overall sales, they are generating significant revenue online. Twenty-one companies on our list have a substantial presence in non-online media, such as newspapers, phone books or TV. Finally, Google is—by far—the most successful digital media company in the U.S. Its revenue is more than three times that of the number two company on the paidContent 50.

For the purposes of this list, we defined a digital media company as a business that is making money directly from the sale of online content or online advertising. So we didn’t include companies like content delivery networks, domain-name registration businesses, or advertising agencies….

10 Rules for Valuation

10 Rules for Valuationby TIM BERRY on DECEMBER 7, 2007 in BUSINESS PLANNING,PLANNING FUNDAMENTALS,VENTURE CAPITAL Read more: http://timberry.bplans.com/2007/12/10-rules-for-va.html#ixzz1HdGebFFc

I really don’t like the word “valuation”; it sounds too much like an MBA buzzword. But I like even less the general confusion about the concept. We talk about starting businesses, we talk about running businesses, getting investment, getting financed, and we should take discussion of valuation for granted. Valuation is at the same time frequently necessary, obvious and extremely arcane. It is nothing more than what a company is worth. It becomes necessary more often than you’d realize, with buy-sell agreements and tax implications after death and divorce, plus financing and investment. It’s obvious because a business is worth what a buyer will pay for it. And then it breaks down into complex formulas and negotiations.

So here are 10 (I hope simple) rules for valuation.

  1. 1. Valuation is what a company is worth. It’s like what a house or a car is worth–less than the seller says, more than the buyer says.
  2. 2. A company’s ownership is almost always divided into shares. Let’s say your company has 100 shares, 51 yours and 49 your co-owner’s.Valuation
  3. 3. Valuation equals shares outstanding times the price of one share. If the company is worth $500,000 and there are 100 shares, then each share is worth $5,000. (OK, there are exceptions, preferred shares and such, but leave the fine tuning for later.)

4 ….
Read more: http://timberry.bplans.com/2007/12/10-rules-for-va.html#ixzz1HdGPVUAT

8 Things You Must Know About Your Audience

8 Things You Must Know About Your Audience

(by Pam Moore of SocialMediaToday.com)

… A good post focusing on some of the key questions that help in understanding who your product or service will address.

Here are the first couple of questions in the post:

1. Who is your audience?
No blanket answers here such as the entire zip code of Tampa, Fl. Instead focus on details and demographics such as:

  • Where do they live?
  • Where do they work?
  • What do they do for fun?
  • What is their lifestyle?
  • Where do they hangout when not at work?
  • Where do they hangout when online?
  • What types of conversation are they having?
  • Are they talking with your partners? With your competition?
  • How much money do they make?
  • What is their lingo? Tone? Casual? Professional?
    *The list goes on and on here. You get my point by now, hopefully!

2. What are their pain points?

  • Why do they need your product?
  • Why do they experience the pain that requires them to need your product?
  • What is the financial, emotional and life impact of the pain? How bad is it?
  • What happens if they don’t have your product or service? What alternative products and services are there?
  • Will they mitigate or reduce the pain themselves if you don’t help them?

Read On…

Article: When a Community News Site Becomes a Facebook-only News Outlet…

Rockville Central: set to become a Facebook-only outlet » Nieman Journalism Lab » Pushing to the Future of Journalism.

Excerpt: ” … Starting March 1,Rockville Central, a community news outlet for the DC-area city of Rockville, Maryland, will move its operation to…its Facebook page. Entirely to its Facebook page.

“There are always two different conversations going on,” Cindy Cotte Griffiths, the site’s editor, told me — one on RockvilleCentral.com, and the other on the site’s Facebook page. Why force the two to compete with each other, when they’re actually, in general, the same conversation? Facebook is, Cotte Griffiths notes, “where the people are.” (Rockville Central currently gets about 2,000 of its average 20,000 monthly hits from Facebook, she told me.) …

[[[ JC: Here’s the most interesting section: ]]]

” …The most immediately obvious drawback, though, is that a site hosted on Facebook can’t host its own local ads. In fact, to make the switch, Rockville Central had to return money to its advertisers.

And that’s a sacrifice it’s willing to make. Profit, Cotte Griffiths notes, isn’t itself the site’s overall goal: She and Rourke see the outlet not so much as a money-making vehicle as an experiment in civic engagement. (That gives Rockville Central much more financial flexibility than, say, The Batavian or theWest Seattle Blog, which function not merely as labors of love, but also as livelihoods for their publishers.) “For entities and organizations that are trying to turn a profit, or have other institutional or organizational reasons to have a separate identity, it can make sense to have a separate web space,” Cotte Griffiths and Rourke note. “But Rockville Central is different and, as we thought hard about it, we realized we could find no compelling reason that Rockville Central needs to exist as a separate rockvillecentral.com site.”

Then again, Rockville Central isn’t, you know, opposed to turning a profit. And building a strong, committed community on Facebook, Cotte Griffiths points out, could be a means toward developing non-ad-based revenue streams in the future, from hosting conferences to staging community events. (Cotte Griffiths’ day job? Event planner.) …. “